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For many owners, dogs are the very figure of the faithful, devoted and affectionate companion, while cats are arrogant, distant and opportunistic.

But don’t these prejudices stem from anthropomorphism, which makes us ascribe to dogs and cats human feelings without perceiving their true intentions?

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How do we know if our dog loves us?

It has long been recognized that dogs feel emotions and can handle love , which they also manifest through many suggestive signals and behaviors.

The love of a dog is reflected in particular by the visible signs of joy that he shows at the sight of his master and during interactions with him.

A dog that wags its tail, barks, celebrates, and adopts postures to invite its master to play can be considered a cheerful puppy.

Other signs of affection , such as licking, physical promiscuity, long passionate looks, not to mention the loyalty and devotion of dogs, are all elements that make experts say that dogs love their owners.

But what about cats? More discreet, cats tend to express their love rather with shy winks , which all feline owners are familiar with.

They will also prove their attachment to their master by agreeing – sometimes – to play and be caressed and even sleep alongside their masters.

For all those who think that cats like their owners less than dogs, felines’ behaviors are often seen as opportunism, but it would seem that this point of view is biased by the common image we have of them. .

Dog vs cat: what does science say?

We recently heard – wrongly and through – of a scientific love test that proved that dogs love their owners on average five times more than cats.

This test, carried out by scientist Paul Zak, consists of measuring oxytocin’s level in the saliva of 10 dogs and 10 cats after and before playing with their owners.

Oxytocin is a hormone to which we attribute an impact on different emotional states in humans and animals, and it is particularly responsible for maternal behavior.

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According to Paul Zak, the oxytocin level would make it possible to assess the degree of attachment, the confidence and the joy felt by an animal in front of its master.

Zak’s experiment shows that dogs secrete a higher rate of oxytocin than cats in the presence of their master (57% higher than the average rate in dogs, against 12% in cats).

He concludes that dogs feel a love (i.e. joy and heightened confidence) towards their masters far superior to cats, while specifying that experience shows however that cats do love their masters.

Much to the chagrin of dog owners who are enthusiastic about these results, however, it seems that experience only proves one thing: that Paul Zak is a dog person.

Although they caused a lot of noise (especially in the name of the “buzz”) , this experiment’s simplistic conclusions conducted during a pseudo-documentary television show are based on fragile data.

Indeed, the nickname “hormone of happiness” attributed to oxytocin has nothing scientific, and many studies on the subject conclude with very contradictory results, which legitimately allow to doubt Zak’s statements.

Oxytocin would also play an important role in anxious and aggressive behaviors. According to many other experts, it is not very credible to determine a psychological profile starting from a hormone – whatever it is.

Also, oxytocin is above all a “social” hormone , which would act mainly (for good or bad) on individuals’ interactions with each other .

Now, if there is one thing that a cat is not, unlike a dog, it is a friendly animal.

Therefore, it shows very little scientific rigor to compare the action of the same hormone on two species opposed in their instinctive behaviors, without taking into account their differences.

Especially since the experiment was carried out in an unfamiliar environment, tending to cause great stress in cats who are anxious about change, unlike dogs who are well wherever they are as long as their master is with them. 

It would seem that the big question that agitates the owners of dogs and cats, often rivals, will therefore not find an answer in this experience.

However, it is commonly believed that these two animals do have feelings for their owners, but express them differently.

In dogs, expressing their emotions is essential to their survival since they are above all a pack animal which must communicate with their peers.

In cats, which are very lonely, the expression of feelings has no interest in survival in the natural state and social behavior is therefore not innate.

 

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How do we know if our dog loves us?

It has long been recognized that dogs feel emotions , and are capable of feeling love , which they also manifest through many suggestive signals and behaviors.

The love of a dog is reflected in particular by the visible signs of joy that he shows at the sight of his master and during interactions with him.

A dog that wags its tail, barks, celebrates, and adopts postures to invite its master to play can be considered a cheerful puppy.

Other signs of affection , such as licking, physical promiscuity, long passionate looks, not to mention the loyalty and devotion of dogs, are all elements that make experts say that dogs love their owners.

But what about cats? More discreet, cats tend to express their love rather with shy winks , which all feline owners are familiar with.

They will also prove their attachment to their master by agreeing – sometimes – to play and be caressed and even sleep alongside their masters.

For all those who think that cats like their owners less than dogs, felines’ behaviors are often seen as opportunism, but it would seem that this point of view is biased by the common image we have of them. .

Dog vs cat: what does science say?

We recently heard – wrongly and through – of a scientific love test that proved that dogs love their owners on average five times more than cats.

This test, carried out by scientist Paul Zak, consists of measuring oxytocin’s level in the saliva of 10 dogs and 10 cats after and before playing with their owners.

Oxytocin is a hormone to which we attribute an impact on different emotional states in humans and animals, and it is particularly responsible for maternal behavior.

According to Paul Zak, the oxytocin level would make it possible to assess the degree of attachment, the confidence and the joy felt by an animal in front of its master.

Zak’s experiment shows that dogs secrete a higher rate of oxytocin than cats in the presence of their master (57% higher than the average rate in dogs, against 12% in cats).

He concludes that dogs feel a love (i.e. joy and heightened confidence) towards their masters far superior to cats, while specifying that experience shows that cats do love their masters.

Much to the chagrin of dog owners who are enthusiastic about these results, however, it seems that experience only proves one thing: that Paul Zak is a dog person.

Although they caused a lot of noise (especially in the name of the “buzz”) , this experiment’s simplistic conclusions conducted during a pseudo-documentary television show are based on fragile data.

Indeed, the nickname “hormone of happiness” attributed to oxytocin has nothing scientific, and many studies on the subject conclude with very contradictory results, which legitimately allow to doubt Zak’s statements.

Oxytocin would also play an important role in anxious and aggressive behaviors. According to many other experts, it is not very credible to determine a psychological profile starting from a hormone – whatever it is.

Also, oxytocin is above all a “social” hormone , which would act mainly (for good or bad) on individuals’ interactions with each other .

Now, if there is one thing that a cat is not, unlike a dog, it is a friendly animal.

Therefore, it shows very little scientific rigor to compare the action of the same hormone on two species opposed in their instinctive behaviors, without taking into account their differences.

Especially since the experiment was carried out in an unfamiliar environment, tending to cause great stress in cats who are anxious about change, unlike dogs who are well wherever they are as long as their master is with them. 

It would seem that the big question that agitates the owners of dogs and cats, often rivals, will therefore not find an answer in this experience.

However, it is commonly believed that these two animals do have feelings for their owners, but express them differently.

In dogs, expressing their emotions is essential to their survival since they are above all a pack animal which must communicate with their peers.

In cats, which are very lonely, the expression of feelings has no interest in survival in the natural state and social behavior is therefore not innate.

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What about the love between DOG and CAT then?

If you have one or more dogs and cats in your home, the question may arise of “love” between them. Is it true that cats and dogs can’t stand each other?

Final words and important recommendations

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but what if you can Develop your Dog’s “Hidden Intelligence” To eliminate bad behavior and Create the obedient, well-behaved pet of your dreams…with a simple, easy and affordable dog training system.

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